Why Facebook Is Making Us Depressed

(Fox Weekly) — Since the start of social media, teenagers have glued their eyes to their monitors, hoping to find fun and joy. Many scientists argue that spending too much time on the computer can cause mental disorders and even depression. It’s not a surprise the amount of people, especially young teens that are currently addicted to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & other social platforms.

It’s crazy to think that as we progress into the future, technology will make it easier to interact with our loved ones with just a click of a mouse.

Facebook has become the dominant social media platform, acquiring billions of visitors a month. Most people are always curious to what their friends or acquaintances are up to. Sure looking at your high school enemy’s new Mustang GT could be dreadful to watch, but a lot of people would feel less superior.

It’s just an utter feeling of seeing others showing off their possessions and yapping about how their relationship couldn’t be any more perfect.

For some, the internet in general, has made them anti-social.

U.S. researches have found a method to predict depression using a user’s Twitter or Facebook account.

There is now strong evidence that links Facebook to ’emotional swings’. It might sound a bit far-fetched but research shows that a person can achieve a certain level of misery or disappointment, when browsing on the website very frequently.

One of these studies comes from the University of Michigan, where researchers conducted an observation of about 82 frequent Facebook users for a 2 week period. The studies confirmed that the longer they spent time on Facebook, the more the depression grew. Surprisingly, a considerable amount of users who suffered depression, did not have it at the start of the study. Ethan Kross, one of the leading researchers of the study stated,

“We were able to show on a moment-to-moment basis throughout the day how people’s mood fluctuated depending on their Facebook usage. We measured lots and lots of other personality and behavioral dimensions, like, for example, frequency of Facebook use, but none of the factors that we assessed influenced the results. The more you used Facebook, the more your mood dropped. The negative effect of Facebook use on happiness became more pronounced the more you interacted with other people within that time frame.”

There are also other forms of mental behavior that are similar to depression that was discovered during the evaluation tests. Jealousy and ‘fear of missing out’ were both constantly tied to the study.

Other studies were also conducted in numerous Universities around the world with identical results.

So let’s face it, Facebook damages our self-esteem. So why do we still have the urge to login every 30 minutes?

I guess we can say our brains love being surprised with new information and Facebook is a temporary cure to our ADHD. It’s time to hit the big red X button and start living life a little more.

I mean, you only live once, why waste it watching everyone else’s?